Category Evidence-based medicine

Staying sane in a world of food frenzy

If I took at face value every medical study I’ve written about this year, I’d be sitting in a corner, chewing slowly on a raw carrot. Here are a few recent news stories, with links to the analyses I wrote for NHS Choices’ Behind the Headlines service: Non-stick chemicals linked to weight gain Slower eating […]

Experts: a celebration of people who know stuff

Michael Gove thinks we’ve had enough of experts. He can live as he chooses, but I have an appointment with a dentist next week, rather than an enthusiast with a pair of pliers. I also have the enormous good fortune to talk  to experts in a variety of fields for my work. These are some of […]

Vitamins in pregnancy

We’ve all seen the adverts, usually accompanied by a photograph of a glowing pregnant woman or an adorable baby, selling vitamins and minerals ‘specially designed’ for pregnancy. They’re often expensive, but for many woman, the reassurance of taking a supplement that seems to promise a healthy pregnancy and a bouncing baby is well worth the […]

Small study, big news

If there’s one thing I’ve learned as a medical journalist, it’s that the size of the study is no predictor of the splash it makes in the media. Last week I analysed two studies which were based on tiny, very specific populations. One added little to our state of knowledge, the other was a scientifically […]

Hot stuff: chilli, curry and long lives

I love writing for the Behind the Headlines service at NHS Choices, because they ask you to do a good job. While mainstream health reporting is so often about finding a catchy angle, or a good headline, BtH is all about looking hard at the evidence and making an assessment of how useful a new […]